Tuesday, March 13, 2012

Perfecting Home-made Chalked Paint Recipe



I used 2 tsp. non-sanded grout
a little water
and about a cup of paint

The first time I tried to make this I ended up with lumps... not impossible to deal with but it got me wondering how I could fix the problem...

 I was thinking gravy...
 The trick is to dissolve the grout in a little water first!

And it worked!


I thought I'd try painting some old metal loaf pans I had, 
if it sticks to metal, 
I'm happy...

and it did!

It went on smoothly, sanded easily
and most importantly  
stuck to a smooth surface!

I distressed the edges and got a great chippy edge 
that looks a little like enamelware...


I then gave them a coat of ASCP wax...
No matter what you paint with, 
the wax is worth the $$!


Nice!


Not sure what I'm going to do with these now, but I'm very happy that the home-made chalked paint  
was a success!

I'll be painting wood with it next...

Hmmmm.... 
maybe mount the pans to a piece of distressed wood....???



These mini loaf pans are great for organizing...

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28 comments:

  1. Holy crap that looks fantastic!!! I think I'd use those as planters - they're gorgeous!

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  2. I've made my own chalk paint and it was great. I also have the wax....when I bought it the lady selling it said it wouldn't work well with other paints but it works fine. I think she was just trying to get me to buy the paint but I can seem to pay that much for such little amount of paint. You pans do look like enamel!

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  3. Lovely!! I just made some using plaster of paris. I am working on painting over an old shelf. I only have one coat so far, but it is lookin' good!

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  4. Awesome recipe! Your pans look great!

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  5. I also did mine, like Kelsey above, with Plaster of Paris, Susan, but that was because it was here already. It came out pretty good, I think, and I used Heirloom White which looks just like the ASCP Old White. The pans do look like they'd be good for organizing. Are they magnetic? You could decorate them as your mood changes if they are.

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  6. Like Kelsey and Kathy, I used plaster of paris because it was here. I really liked how it stuck on well but then sanded off well when I wanted it to. Thanks for telling us about the non-sanded grout additive also...your pans look like real vintage.

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  7. Wow, those turned out really cute and thanks for the recipe...I have wanted to try chalk like paint. I have lots of grout. I love the interior green!

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  8. What a terrific idea. I've been wanting to try the ASCP but I'm going to use this recipe instead. The pans look great.

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  9. I actually have used this recipe before as well and I love it... my question is what do you use for a after coating? I used poly and it yellowed it. Have you used anything?

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  10. They look great Susan. I think they would look fantastic with distressed wood.

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  11. I used calcium carbonate for my own mixture of "chalky paint" , didn't add water to thin the paint and got no lumps at all since the powder is so fine! Your metal pans do resemble enameled pieces. Yes , attach them to the wood as organizational boxes. :-)
    Sue

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  12. I tried it with the unsanded grout and it was lumpy and kept getting thicker. Thanks for the tip. I'll try mixing with water to get the lumps out next time. I had to buy a 10lb bag of it just to get the 2 TBL I needed, so I should be good for a lot more experimenting. LOL Love the loaf pans. I think they would look great on the distressed board planted with some grass seed. But there are endless possibilities there.

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  13. Thanks for the recipe and your tips, Susan. I have been wanting to try this.
    I LOVE your loaf pans. The turned out beautiful!! Enjoy your day!!

    sandraallen260@centurytel.net

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  14. mmmm loving those loaf pans (as I'm typing this out I'm laughing - I've never said or typed that phrase before!) we bloggers are a unique bunch aren't we? Awesome little project. I bought the supplies a few months back for this chalk paint recipe & haven't experimented yet but with the warm weather coming our way - I'll be attacking some poor item to paint up soon! xo

    www.NorthernCottage.net

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  15. Yours is the first link I checked out and I can't wait to try this recipe--you seem to have it perfected!

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  16. I have been making my own chalk style paint also, but I've used plaster. I've had the same results and I love it! Those bread pans are darling. I love how the paint brought out the fold on the ends. You will think of a dozen uses for those! Lisa~

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  17. I have made my own chalk paint as well, using leftover latex paint from my walls (see my fridge on my blog) but was also left with lumpy paint. I tried and tried to get the lumps out, but couldn't. Wish I'd have thought of the water! You're a genius!!!! LOL And I LOVE those loaf pans!

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  18. Thanks for sharing the "new improved" recipe. I love how your pans turned out. They look perfect on that aged board. I'll be watching for old loaf pans at garage sales now!

    {{hugs}}
    Deborah

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  19. very cool. so what does the wax do??
    and what is ASCP wax?

    thanks
    blessings
    barbara jean

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  20. ok
    found it on internet. annie sloan.....
    =)

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  21. I tried this recipe using plaster of paris with the paint and a little water. I am trying to paint a second hand dining room set. it would not stick to the chairs. I keep reading about how it will go over old varnish etc. with no sanding, so what is the deal, will it or won't it. or is it as they say 'too good to be true".

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    Replies
    1. Fay I hope you see this... I couldn't respond directly to your question because you are on "no-reply".... I don't know why it isn't sticking to your chairs, are you letting it dry before you put on a second coat? I've never had a problem, even painted right over a very shiny varnished hutch and had absolutely no problem with it not sticking. I would let it dry first.
      Susan

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  22. This is a great idea, oh there are soooo many things I can paint over to give a new lease of life. Thanks for the tips and recipe!

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  23. Have you tried it on brick? I have a hideous fireplace that needs a face lift!

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  24. yeah! now I can get rid of my chalk paint lumps

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  25. thanks for posting this...will def try in the near future...got numerous project that this would be good for!! great blog!!

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  26. Great little pans! I just painted one yellow the other day and have it holding tea in the kitchen. Great job on your paint mixture.

    ~Kim

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Susan

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